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Massachusetts School Psychologists Association

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School Psychologist Evaluation Rubric

The Massachusetts School Psychologists Association (MSPA) has developed this rubric for the evaluation of school psychologists for adoption, in part or in whole, by Massachusetts school districts. The MSPA rubric is patterned after the DESE Specialized Instructional Support Personnel rubric: it uses the same standards, indicators and elements–plus two additional elements (I.C.4. Intervention Monitoring and Evaluation, and III.C.3. Community Connections). DESE personnel have reviewed this rubric and determined that it complies with Massachusetts requirements.


Download MSPA School Psychologist Evaluation Rubric »

What differs from the DESE rubric is that the performance descriptors specifically address the customary activities of school psychologists. To ensure relevance to the practice of school psychology, the MSPA rubric is aligned with the Comprehensive Practice Model of the National Association of School Psychologists (2010), which outlines 10 key domains of practice.

The development of this rubric began when MSPA responded to the DESE invitation to provide input into an evaluation model that was applicable to the roles and functions of school psychologists. Given that the goal of an educational evaluation system is to define and promote “best practice” that leads to positive student outcomes, MSPA was guided by the principle that a practical and discipline-specific rubric would best serve this purpose and have the best prospect of being valued and purposefully applied by Massachusetts K-12 educators.

As it is unfeasible to meaningfully evaluate all 36 elements of this rubric, MSPA proposes that school districts select a subset of elements to be universally applied or more heavily weighted. MSPA has identified a recommended set of 21 critical elements for higher priority consideration. These elements, indicated by bold face and larger font type, were selected using the following criteria:

+ Relevance: maximum coverage of the 10 domains of the NASP practice model;
+ Non-redundancy: minimal overlap with other elements of the rubric;
+ Feasibility: can be operationalized and meaningfully evaluated by a school district evaluator; and
+ Importance: significant contribution to positive outcomes for students, and high value for the school community.

Priorities and service delivery models will understandably vary from district to district, and may evolve over time. Hence, it is expected that school districts will adapt or excerpt material from this rubric as needed. Most of this rubric can be evaluated by an administrator who is highly familiar with a school psychologist’s work, supplemented by input from other consumers of school psychological services (e.g., teachers and parents). However, some items (labeled QP) require more technical or advanced knowledge of school psychological services, and should only be evaluated by a “qualified practitioner”.


Download MSPA School Psychologist Evaluation Rubric »


National Association of School Psychologists (NASP)

The National Association of School Psychologists has listed the domains of competency for school psychologists and additionally has described examples of each domain as they would be observed in practice. These can be downloaded below.

Download NASP 10 Domains of Practice»

Download NASP 10 Domain Bulleted Examples»

Delaware Association of School Psychologists (DASP)

The document below, used with permission from the Delaware Association of School Psychologists (DASP), provides sample SMART goals for school psychologists. Created with the NASP Domains in mind, the goals are suitable for school psychologists in Massachusetts to use as part of the Educator Evaluation process. MSPA is working with DESE to create a similar document for use in Massachusetts. Questions about the School Psychology Rubric or the SMART goals can be directed to SPEvaluations@gmail.com

Download DASP SMART goals PDF»

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Welcome to the online home of the Massachusetts School Psychologists Association.
CONTACT MSPA

Membership renewal season is underway…

  • MSPA President
    Bob Babigian CAGS, NCSP
  • President Elect
    Andria Amador CAGS, NCSP
  • Vice President
    Jennifer Milia CAGS, NCSP
  • Treasurer
    Rachel Kalinsky CAGS, NCSP
  • Co/Assistant Treasurer
    Thea Showstack CAGS, NCSP
  • Secretary
    Jenna Johnson CAGS, NCSP
  • Immediate Past President
    Wendy Price CAGS, NCSP
  • NASP Representative
    Wendy Price CAGS, NCSP

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